Classifying wines by style is an ambitious attempt to delineate using a combination of factors, including taste and color using, a broad term.

DRY WHITE WINE

The wine will be “dry”; not sweet, when red or white grapes clear juices are pressed and all of the sugars from the grapes are allowed to turn to alcohol.

Syrah, Cabernet, Malbec, Petite Syrah, Tannat, Nebbiolo, Tempranillo, Monastell

SEMI-SWEET WHITE WINE

An “off-dry” or slightly sweet wine results when the fermentation process is stopped prior to all of the sugar being turned to alcohol.

ROSE

Allowing the juice of red grapes to sit in contact with its skins or by adding a bit of red wine to white wine makers achieve the pink color in a Rosé wine.

DRY RED WINE

Dry red wines are produced when both juice and skins of the red grape are used and all of the sugars are allowed to turn to alcohol.

SPARKLING WINE

Along with generating alcohol, the process of fermentation builds gas which is released as bubbles in sparkling wine, once the wine has been opened and poured.

SWEET WINE

A wine that contains very high levels or sugar is considered a sweet wine, or desert wine. By leaving the grapes on the vine for extended ripening time, the buildup of sugars in the grape continues. Due to the excessive sugar levels achieved, even after fermentation, much of the sugar still remains in the wine.

FORTIFIED WINE

If the alcohol content of the wine has been increased by the addition of neutral spirits or bandy it is considered to be fortified.

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